Forgiveness

God is a loving God whose will is not for us to live in eternal punishment. That’s why He sent His Son, Jesus Christ, to live the perfect life He requires and to become our substitute. Christ never sinned — not even once — and then He took our sin upon Himself and died on the cross, on our behalf. When we believe in Jesus Christ as our Savior, He bears our sin and gives us His forgiveness.

There is absolutely nothing we can do to “be saved” —  Jesus Christ has already done everything necessary. In His death and resurrection, everyone who believes in Jesus as Savior has been brought back into a right relationship with God. That means that, on account of Jesus, everyone who believes is “justified,” or declared innocent by God. God has done justice to the world’s sins; because of Jesus, all who believe are forgiven and will live eternally.

"For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith-and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God-not by works, so that no one can boast."

(Ephesians 2:8-9)

We do not cooperate in our salvation and there is nothing we could ever present to God to make our way into eternal life with Him — not money or even good works. Neither can we really feel it nor prove it. We cannot reason our way to salvation, nor can we earn it. There is nothing we can do to save ourselves — Jesus Christ has done it all.

It is through faith in Jesus that we receive the forgiveness of sins and eternal life — by believing that He has freed us from the guilt, punishment, and power of sin. Faith is a gift worked in us by the power of the Holy Spirit; it doesn’t come to us through anything we are capable of, but through what God does for us. We simply receive what is already being offered out of God’s great love.

Lutherans often refer to grace. The word itself might remind you of the grace period you are given when paying bills – when your debt can be paid without further penalty. God’s grace is even more wonderful; that’s why it’s called “amazing grace.” While we deserved to pay the penalty for our sins, God had a different plan. Christ paid the debt and we receive forgiveness and eternal life from Him that is offered out of unconditional love. That’s why it’s called grace because it is truly undeserved.

God has provided tangible ways through which He delivers His grace to those who believe, assuring us that the sins we commit are forgiven for Jesus’ sake. These are called the “means of grace” and are God’s Word, Holy Baptism, and the Lord’s Supper (Holy Communion). Through these means, God makes Himself known to us in a very personal way: God’s Word reveals His faithfulness and love; Baptism is our rebirth and renewal in Jesus; the Lord’s Supper is our closest communion with Christ as we receive His body and blood.

Since there is nothing we can ever do to earn salvation, we do not do good works in order to be saved, good works are done out of praise and thanks because we are saved. Such good works include, but are certainly not limited to, serving and caring for the needs of others, honoring and giving respect to those in authority, honoring our vows and commitments, and generally doing what is considered by many to be good and right. It’s often said that Martin Luther expressed it this way: “God doesn’t need our good works, but our neighbor does.”

We do not cooperate in our salvation and there is nothing we could ever present to God to make our way into eternal life with Him — not money or even good works. Neither can we really feel it nor prove it. We cannot reason our way to salvation, nor can we earn it. There is nothing we can do to save ourselves — Jesus Christ has done it all.

It is through faith in Jesus that we receive the forgiveness of sins and eternal life — by believing that He has freed us from the guilt, punishment, and power of sin. Faith is a gift worked in us by the power of the Holy Spirit; it doesn’t come to us through anything we are capable of, but through what God does for us. We simply receive what is already being offered out of God’s great love.

God has provided tangible ways through which He delivers His grace to those who believe, assuring us that the sins we commit are forgiven for Jesus’ sake. These are called the “means of grace” and are God’s Word, Holy Baptism, and the Lord’s Supper (Holy Communion). Through these means, God makes Himself known to us in a very personal way: God’s Word reveals His faithfulness and love; Baptism is our rebirth and renewal in Jesus; the Lord’s Supper is our closest communion with Christ as we receive His body and blood.

Since there is nothing we can ever do to earn salvation, we do not do good works in order to be saved, good works are done out of praise and thanks because we are saved. Such good works include, but are certainly not limited to, serving and caring for the needs of others, honoring and giving respect to those in authority, honoring our vows and commitments, and generally doing what is considered by many to be good and right. It’s often said that Martin Luther expressed it this way: “God doesn’t need our good works, but our neighbor does.”

God has provided tangible ways through which He delivers His grace to those who believe, assuring us that the sins we commit are forgiven for Jesus’ sake. These are called the “means of grace” and are God’s Word, Holy Baptism, and the Lord’s Supper (Holy Communion). Through these means, God makes Himself known to us in a very personal way: God’s Word reveals His faithfulness and love; Baptism is our rebirth and renewal in Jesus; the Lord’s Supper is our closest communion with Christ as we receive His body and blood.

Since there is nothing we can ever do to earn salvation, we do not do good works in order to be saved, good works are done out of praise and thanks because we are saved. Such good works include, but are certainly not limited to, serving and caring for the needs of others, honoring and giving respect to those in authority, honoring our vows and commitments, and generally doing what is considered by many to be good and right. It’s often said that Martin Luther expressed it this way: “God doesn’t need our good works, but our neighbor does.”