St. John's Lutheran Church

First Lutheran Church Missouri Synod in Utah

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Bible Study Archive

Moses viewing the Promised Land

Deuteronomy

The book of Deuteronomy is the last of the Five Books of Moses. It consists of three sermons delivered to the Israelites by Moses on the Plains of Moab shortly before they entered the Promised Land. It also includes the Song of Moses, the Blessing of Moses, and narratives recounting the passing of the mantle of leadership from Moses to Joshua and, finally, Moses’s death on Mount Nebo.
 
One of its most significant verses is Deuteronomy 6:4, the Shema Yisrael, which has been described as the definitive statement of Jewish identity for theistic Jews: “Hear, O Israel: the LORD our God, the LORD is one.” Verses 6:4–5 were also quoted by Jesus in Mark 12:28–34 as the Great Commandment.
Balaam's donkey

Numbers

Numbers tells how God’s people traveled from Mount Sinai to the border of the Promised Land. But when they refused to take possession of the Land, God made them wander in the wilderness for nearly forty years. Throughout the book, God is seen as a holy God who cannot ignore rebellion or unbelief but also as the one who faithfully keeps his covenant and patiently provides for the needs of his people. Numbers ends with a new generation preparing for the conquest of Canaan.

Leviticus

Leviticus begins with the people of Israel at the foot of Mount Sinai. The glory of the Lord had just filled the Tabernacle (Ex. 40:34–38) and God now tells Moses to instruct the Levitical priests and the people of Israel concerning sacrifices, worship, the priesthood, ceremonial cleanness, the Day of Atonement, feasts and holy days, and the Year of Jubilee. The central message is that God is holy and he requires his people to be holy. The book also shows that God graciously provides atonement for sin through the shedding of blood. 
 
Artist William Holman Hunt,  “Scapegoat“.

Exodus

Exodus is all about God making Israel his own. God rescues the descendants of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (whom he made some important promises to back in Genesis). Then he gives them his expectations — a list of dos and don’ts. Finally, God sets up camp in the midst of the new nation: they are his people, and he is their God.

When God gave Israel the Ten Commandments, he frames them by stating his relationship to the Hebrews. This verse sums up the themes of Exodus nicely:

“I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.” (Ex 20:2)

Our Pastor “Hank” Malone will meet online with us every Wednesday morning at 10 a.m. for a one-hour bible study and discussion. The study is free.

This is an ongoing Bible Study, to attend, please email Susan for the Zoom address and passcode.

Prophets

In Christianity, the figures widely recognized as prophets are those mentioned as such in the Old Testament and the New Testament. It is believed that prophets are chosen and called by God.

First Epistle of Peter

The First Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament. The author presents himself as Peter the Apostle. The ending of the letter includes a statement that implies that it was written from “Babylon”, which is possibly a reference to Rome. The letter is addressed to the “chosen pilgrims of the diaspora” in Asia Minor suffering religious persecution.

Epistle of James

The Epistle of James is a general epistle and one of the 21 epistles (didactic letters) in the New Testament.

James 1:1 identifies the author as “James, a servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ” who is writing to “the twelve tribes scattered abroad”. The epistle is traditionally attributed to James the brother of Jesus (James the Just), and the audience is generally considered to be Jewish Christians, who were dispersed outside Israel.

Framing his letter within an overall theme of patient perseverance during trials and temptations, James writes in order to encourage his readers to live consistently with what they have learned in Christ. He condemns various sins, including pride, hypocrisy, favoritism, and slander. He encourages and implores believers to humbly live by godly, rather than worldly wisdom and to pray in all situations.

First Epistle of John

The First Epistle of John is the first of the Johannine epistles of the New Testament, and the fourth of the catholic epistles. There is no scholarly consensus as to the authorship of the Johannine works. The author of the First Epistle is termed John the Evangelist, who most scholars believe is not the same as John the Apostle. Most scholars believe the three Johannine epistles have the same author, but there is no consensus if this was also the author of the Gospel of John.

Revelation

The Book of Revelation is the final book of the New Testament (and consequently the final book of the Christian Bible). Its title is derived from the first word of the Koine Greek text: apokalypsis, meaning “unveiling” or “revelation”. The Book of Revelation is the only apocalyptic book in the New Testament canon. It occupies a central place in Christian eschatology.